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Br J Sports Med. 2003 Feb;37(1):72-5.

The effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness.

Author information

1
Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Center for Health Sciences, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological and psychological effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).

METHODS:

Eighteen volunteers were randomly assigned to either a massage or control group. DOMS was induced with six sets of eight maximal eccentric contractions of the right hamstring, which were followed 2 h later by 20 min of massage or sham massage (control). Peak torque and mood were assessed at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Range of motion (ROM) and intensity and unpleasantness of soreness were assessed at 6, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Neutrophil count was assessed at 6 and 24 h postexercise.

RESULTS:

A two factor ANOVA (treatment v time) with repeated measures on the second factor showed no significant treatment differences for peak torque, ROM, neutrophils, unpleasantness of soreness, and mood (p > 0.05). The intensity of soreness, however, was significantly lower in the massage group relative to the control group at 48 h postexercise (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Massage administered 2 h after exercise induced muscle injury did not improve hamstring function but did reduce the intensity of soreness 48 h after muscle insult.

PMID:
12547748
PMCID:
PMC1724592
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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