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Scand J Immunol. 2003 Jan;57(1):11-20.

Mesenchymal stem cells inhibit and stimulate mixed lymphocyte cultures and mitogenic responses independently of the major histocompatibility complex.

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1
Division of Clinical Immunology; Centre for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. katarina.leblanc@medhs.ki.se

Abstract

We aimed to study the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on alloreactivity and effects of T-cell activation on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in vitro. MSCs were expanded from the bone marrow of healthy subjects. MSCs isolated from second to third passage were positive for CD166, CD105, CD44, CD29, SH-3 and SH-4, but negative for CD34 and CD45. MSCs cultured in osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic media differentiated, respectively, into osteocytes, adipocytes or chondrocytes. MSC added to PBL cultures had various effects, ranging from slight inhibition to stimulation of DNA synthesis. The stimulation index (SI = (PBL + MSC)/PBL) varied between 0.2 and 7.3. The SI was not affected by the MSC dose or by the addition of allogeneic or autologous MSCs to the lymphocytes. Suppression of proliferative activity was observed in all experiments after the addition of 10,000-40,000 MSCs to mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLCs). Lymphocyte proliferation was 10-90%, compared with a control MLC run in parallel without MSCs. In contrast, the addition of fewer MSCs (10-1000 cells) led to a less consistent suppression or a marked lymphocyte proliferation in several experiments, ranging from 40 to 190% of the maximal lymphocyte proliferation in control MLCs. The ability to inhibit or stimulate T-cell alloresponses appeared to be independent of the major histocompatibility complex, as results were similar using 'third party' MSCs or MSCs that were autologous to the responder or stimulating PBLs. The strongest inhibitory effect was seen if MSCs were added at the beginning of the 6 day culture, and the effect declined if MSCs were added on day 3 or 5. Marked inhibitory effects of allogeneic and autologous MSCs (15,000) were also noted after mitogenic lymphocyte stimulation by phytohaemagglutinin (median lymphocyte proliferation of 30% of controls), Concanavalin A (56%) and protein A (65%). Little, if any, inhibition occurred after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Low numbers of MSCs (150 cells) were unable to inhibit mitogen-induced T-cell responses. MSCs have significant immune modulatory effects on MLCs and after mitogenic stimulation of PBL. High numbers of MSCs suppress alloreactive T cells, whereas very low numbers clearly stimulated lymphocyte proliferation in some experiments. The effect of a larger number of MSCs on MLCs seems more dependent on cell dose than histocompatibility and could result from an 'overload' of a stimulatory mechanism.

PMID:
12542793
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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