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Diabetes. 2003 Feb;52(2):442-7.

Inflammation-sensitive plasma proteins, diabetes, and mortality and incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke: a population-based study.

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1
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden. gunnar.engstrom@smi.mas.lu.se

Abstract

This study explores the relationship of inflammation-sensitive plasma proteins (ISPs) with the prevalence of diabetes and the interrelationships between ISPs and diabetes in the prediction of death and incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. Plasma levels of fibrinogen, alpha1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, and orosomucoid were assessed in 6,050 men, aged 28-61 years. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality and incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke were monitored over 18.7 +/- 3.7 years. Prevalence of diabetes (n = 321) was significantly associated with ISP levels among overweight and obese men but not among men with BMI <25 kg/m(2). The association was similar for insulin resistance according to homeostasis model assessment. High ISP levels (two or more ISPs in the top quartile) increased the cardiovascular risk among diabetic men. The risk factor-adjusted relative risks for cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke were 2.8 (CI 1.8-4.5), 2.2 (1.5-3.2), and 2.5 (1.4-4.6), respectively, for diabetic men with high ISP levels (reference: nondiabetic men with low ISP levels). The corresponding risks for diabetic men with low ISP levels were 1.8 (1.1-3.0), 1.3 (0.8-2.1), and 1.2 (0.6-2.5), respectively. In conclusion, in this population-based cohort, diabetes was associated with increased ISP levels among overweight and obese men but not among men with normal weight. High ISP levels increased the cardiovascular risk similarly in diabetic as compared with nondiabetic men.

PMID:
12540619
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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