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Mov Disord. 2003 Feb;18(2):138-49.

Effects of CB1 cannabinoid receptor modulating compounds on the hyperkinesia induced by high-dose levodopa in the reserpine-treated rat model of Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Division of Neuroscience, School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. segoviag@med.ucm.es

Abstract

The present study was designed to determine the potential of CB1 cannabinoid receptor modulating compounds in the treatment of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa)-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease. In the reserpine-treated rat model of parkinsonism, administration of a high dose of L-dopa (150 mg/kg) but not of Cl-APB (0.5 mg/kg) or quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg) produced a hyperkinetic state characterised by an increase in horizontal and vertical activity, which likely represent correlates of antiparkinsonian and dyskinetic activity, respectively. Injection of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716 (0.1-3 mg/kg) reduced the increase in vertical activity elicited by L-dopa without affecting the increase in horizontal activity. Injection of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (0.1-3 mg/kg) reduced the L-dopa-induced increase in vertical activity and, at the highest dose only (3 mg/kg), also reduced horizontal activity elicited by L-dopa. WIN55,212-2 (1 mg/kg) reduced motor activity induced by both the D1 receptor agonist Cl-APB (0.5 mg/kg) and the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg) in the reserpine-treated rat. SR141716 (1 mg/kg) had no effects on motor activity induced by Cl-APB (0.5 mg/kg) nor quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg) in the reserpine-treated rat. Injection of the inhibitor of endocannabinoid transport AM404 (0.1-1 mg/kg) did not affect the increase in horizontal or vertical activity elicited by L-dopa (150 mg/kg) in the reserpine-treated rat. The data suggest that both CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonists and agonists can modulate the behavioural effects of L-dopa and may be useful for the treatment of the dyskinesia associated with long-term L-dopa treatment of Parkinson's disease.

PMID:
12539206
DOI:
10.1002/mds.10312
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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