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J Histochem Cytochem. 2003 Feb;51(2):215-26.

Localization of a mitochondrial type of NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase in kidney and heart of rat: an immunocytochemical and biochemical study.

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1
Biology Laboratory, Yamanashi Medical University, Japan.

Abstract

We studied the subcellular localization of the mitochondrial type of NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD1) in rat was immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy and by biochemical methods, including immunoblotting and Nycodenz gradient centrifugation. Antibodies against a 14-amino-acid peptide at the C-terminus of mouse ICD1 was prepared. Immunoblotting analysis of the Triton X-100 extract of heart and kidney showed that the antibodies developed a single band with molecular mass of 45 kD. ICD1 was highly expressed in heart, kidney, and brown fat but only a low level of ICD1 was expressed in other tissues, including liver. Immunofluorescence staining showed that ICD1 was present mainly in mitochondria and, to a much lesser extent, in nuclei. Low but significant levels of activity and antigen of ICD1 were found in nuclei isolated by equilibrium sedimentation. Immunoblotting analysis of subcellular fractions isolated by Nycodenz gradient centrifugation from rat liver revealed that ICD1 signals were exclusively distributed in mitochondrial fractions in which acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was present. Immunofluorescence staining and postembedding electron microscopy demonstrated that ICD1 was confined almost exclusively to mitochondria and nuclei of rat kidney and heart muscle. The results show that ICD1 is expressed in the nuclei in addition to the mitochondria of rat heart and kidney. In the nuclei, the enzyme is associated with heterochromatin. In kidney, ICD1 distributes differentially in the tubule segments.

PMID:
12533530
DOI:
10.1177/002215540305100210
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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