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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2003 May;94(5):1917-25. Epub 2003 Jan 17.

Carbohydrate ingestion influences skeletal muscle cytokine mRNA and plasma cytokine levels after a 3-h run.

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1
Department of Health, Fischer Hamilton/Nycom Biochemistry Laboratory, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina 28608, USA. niemandc@appstate.edu

Abstract

Sixteen experienced marathoners ran on treadmills for 3 h at approximately 70% maximal oxygen consumption (Vo(2 max)) on two occasions while receiving 1 l/h carbohydrate (CHO) or placebo (Pla) beverages. Blood and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples were collected before and after exercise. Plasma was analyzed for IL-6, IL-10, IL-1 receptor agonist (IL-1ra), IL-8, cortisol, glucose, and insulin. Muscle was analyzed for glycogen content and relative gene expression of 13 cytokines by using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Plasma glucose and insulin were higher, and cortisol, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1ra, but not IL-8, were significantly lower postexercise in CHO vs. Pla. Change in muscle glycogen content did not differ between CHO and Pla (P = 0.246). Muscle cytokine mRNA content was detected preexercise for seven cytokines in this order (highest to lowest): IL-15, TNF-alpha, IL-8, IL-1beta, IL-12p35, IL-6, and IFN-gamma. After subjects ran for 3 h, gene expression above prerun levels was measured for five of these cytokines: IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 (large increases), and IL-10 and TNF-alpha (small increases). The increase in mRNA (fold difference from preexercise) was attenuated in CHO (15.9-fold) compared with Pla (35.2-fold) for IL-6 (P = 0.071) and IL-8 (CHO, 7.8-fold; Pla, 23.3-fold; P = 0.063). CHO compared with Pla beverage ingestion attenuates the increase in plasma IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1ra and gene expression for IL-6 and IL-8 in athletes running 3 h at 70% Vo(2 max) despite no differences in muscle glycogen content.

PMID:
12533503
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.01130.2002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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