Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jan;139(1):33-6.

Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: a prospective noncomparative study showing no benefit on mortality or progression.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France. bachot.nicolas@wanadoo.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It has been proposed that Fas-Fas ligand interaction was responsible for the apoptosis of epidermal cells in Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and that high doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) could help patients by blocking the apoptosis.

OBJECTIVE:

To study the effects of IVIG on SJS and TEN.

DESIGN:

Prospective open trial.

SETTING:

Referral center of a university hospital.

PATIENTS:

Thirty-four consecutive patients admitted for SJS (n = 9), SJS-TEN (n = 5), or TEN (n = 20) a mean of 4.3 days after onset.

INTERVENTION:

A dose of 2 g/kg of IVIG was administered within 2 days (half doses or full doses over a longer period for patients with low creatinine clearance).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Detached plus detachable proportions of the total body surface area measured before and after treatment and predicted death rate estimated on admission with a validated prognostic score.

RESULTS:

Epidermal detachment involved a mean +/- SD 19% +/- 16% of the total body surface area on admission and 32% +/- 26% after IVIG treatment (progression in 22 of 34 cases, including most patients referred early). The prognostic score predicted 8.2 deaths (24%); 11 were observed (32%; 95% confidence interval, 17%-51%). Most deaths occurred in elderly patients who had initially impaired renal function.

CONCLUSIONS:

The confidence interval of the observed death rate excludes a dramatic decrease in mortality. No measurable effect was observed on the progression of detachment or on the speed of reepidermalization. These results do not support the routine use of IVIG treatment for patients with SJS or TEN, especially in cases of impaired renal function.

PMID:
12533161
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center