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Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol. 2003 Jan-Feb;26(1):19-26. Epub 2003 Jan 16.

Percutaneous management of occlusive arterial disease associated with vasculitis: a single center experience.

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1
Department of Radiology, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany. mboth@rad.uni-kiel.de

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for occlusive arterial disease associated with vasculitis. Eleven patients (10 women, 1 man; ages 35-82 years) with the diagnosis of vasculitis of the large vessels underwent interventional treatment during intraarterial angiography. The causes included giant cell arteritis (n = 8) and Takayasu arteritis (n = 3). Thirty-three occlusive lesions (including brachiocephalic and renal arteries, and arteries of upper and lower extremities) were treated with balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. Follow-up included clinical examination, angiography, and color duplex ultrasound. Technical success was 100% (25/25) for stenoses and 50% (4/8) for occlusive lesions, representing all lesions combined from different anatomic locations. Dissection (n = 3) and arterial rupture with retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1) was found in three patients. During follow-up (mean 12 months), restenoses (n = 8) and re-restenoses (n = 1) occurred in 8 vascular areas. Three of these lesions were treated with repeated PTA (n = 4). The cumulative primary clinical success rate was 67.6%, cumulative secondary success rate 74.4%, and cumulative tertiary success rate 75.9%. Interventional therapy in systemic vasculitis provides promising results in technical success rates and followup. Angioplasty may result in arterial injury, but the rate of complications is low.

PMID:
12525937
DOI:
10.1007/s00270-002-2610-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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