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Ann Surg. 2003 Jan;237(1):123-8.

Prevention of adhesion to prosthetic mesh: comparison of different barriers using an incisional hernia model.

Author information

1
Department of General Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, The Netherlands. vantriet@hlkd.azr.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether use of antiadhesive liquids or coatings could prevent adhesion formation to prosthetic mesh.

SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA:

Incisional hernia repair frequently involves the use of prosthetic mesh. However, concern exists about development of adhesions between viscera and the mesh, predisposing to intestinal obstruction or enterocutaneous fistulas.

METHODS:

In 91 rats, a defect in the muscular abdominal wall was created, and mesh was fixed intraperitoneally to cover the defect. Rats were divided in five groups: polypropylene mesh only (control group), addition of Sepracoat or Icodextrin solution to polypropylene mesh, Sepramesh (polypropylene mesh with Seprafilm coating), and Parietex composite mesh (polyester mesh with collagen coating). Seven and 30 days postoperatively, adhesions were assessed and wound healing was studied by microscopy.

RESULTS:

Intraperitoneal placement of polypropylene mesh was followed by bowel adhesions to the mesh in 50% of the cases. A mean of 74% of the mesh surface was covered by adhesions after 7 days, and 48% after 30 days. Administration of Sepracoat or Icodextrin solution had no influence on adhesion formation. Coated meshes (Sepramesh and Parietex composite mesh) had no bowel adhesions. Sepramesh was associated with a significant reduction of the mesh surface covered by adhesions after 7 and 30 days. Infection was more prevalent with Parietex composite mesh, with concurrent increased mesh surface covered by adhesions after 30 days (78%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Sepramesh significantly reduced mesh surface covered by adhesions and prevented bowel adhesion to the mesh. Parietex composite mesh prevented bowel adhesions as well but increased infection rates in the current model.

PMID:
12496539
PMCID:
PMC1513975
DOI:
10.1097/00000658-200301000-00017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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