Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Public Health Rep. 2002 Jul-Aug;117(4):350-7.

Cumulative trauma disorder risk for children using computer products: results of a pilot investigation with a student convenience sample.

Author information

1
Institute for Holistic Healing Studies/Health Education, San Francisco State Univ., San Francisco, CA 94132, USA. aburke@sfsu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Cumulative trauma disorder is a major health problem for adults. Despite a growing understanding of adult cumulative trauma disorder, however, little is known about the risks for younger populations. This investigation examined issues related to child/adolescent computer product use and upper body physical discomfort.

METHODS:

A convenience sample of 212 students, grades 1-12, was interviewed at their homes by a college-age sibling or relative. One of the child's parents was also interviewed. A 22-item questionnaire was used for data-gathering. Questionnaire items included frequency and duration of use, type of computer products/games and input devices used, presence of physical discomfort, and parental concerns related to the child's computer use.

RESULTS:

Many students experienced physical discomfort attributed to computer use, such as wrist pain (30%) and back pain (15%). Specific computer activities-such as using a joystick or playing noneducational games-were significantly predictive of physical discomfort using logistic multiple regression. Many parents reported difficulty getting their children off the computer (46%) and that their children spent less time outdoors (35%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Computer product use within this cohort was associated with self-reported physical discomfort. Results suggest a need for more extensive study, including multiyear longitudinal surveys.

PMID:
12477916
PMCID:
PMC1497444
DOI:
10.1093/phr/117.4.350
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center