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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2002 Dec;83(12):1739-44.

Static trunk posture in sitting and standing during pregnancy and early postpartum.

Author information

1
School of Exercise Science and Sport Management, Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia. wgillear@scu.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the postural alignment of the upper body in the sagittal plane during sitting and standing postures as pregnancy progressed and then in the postpartum period.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal, repeated-measures design.

SETTING:

Biomechanics laboratory in an Australian university.

PARTICIPANTS:

A volunteer convenience sample of 9 primiparous and multiparous women and 12 nulliparous women serving as a control group.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Subjects were filmed while sitting and during quiet standing at intervals throughout pregnancy and at 8 weeks postpartum. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to assess systematic changes in the alignment of the pelvic, thoracic, and head segments, and the thoracolumbar and cervicothoracic spines. Student t tests were used to compare the postpartum and nulliparous control groups.

RESULTS:

There was no significant effect of pregnancy on the upper-body posture, although there was a tendency in some subjects for a flatter thoracolumbar spinal curve in sitting as pregnancy progressed. Postpartum during standing, the pelvic segment had a reduced sagittal plane anterior orientation, and the thoracolumbar spine was less extended, indicating a flatter spinal curve compared with the control group.

CONCLUSIONS:

There was no significant effect of pregnancy on upper-body posture during sitting and standing, although individuals varied in their postural response. A flatter spinal curve was found during standing postpartum.

PMID:
12474180
DOI:
10.1053/apmr.2002.36069
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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