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Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Dec 15;35(12):1484-90. Epub 2002 Dec 2.

Epidemiology of bloodstream infection in nursing home residents: evaluation in a large cohort from multiple homes.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA. mylotte@buffalo.edu

Abstract

This study sought to reevaluate the epidemiology of bloodstream infection in nursing home residents. The records of 166 nursing home residents admitted to an urban, public, university-affiliated hospital with 169 episodes of bloodstream infection between January 1997 and April 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. The most common organisms isolated were Escherichia coli (27% of isolates), Staphylococcus aureus (18%; 29% were methicillin-resistant strains), and Proteus mirabilis (13%). There was minimal resistance to quinolones and third-generation cephalosporins among aerobic gram-negative bacilli. The most common sources were the urinary tract (51% of episodes) and the lungs (11%); a source was not identified in 22% of episodes. Hospital mortality was 18%. Independent predictors of hospital mortality were a pulmonary source of infection, systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg, and leukocytosis >20,000 cells/mm3. Compared with other studies published in the past 2 decades, mortality was lower. The most common resistant organism was methicillin-resistant S. aureus.

PMID:
12471567
DOI:
10.1086/344649
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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