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Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(11):1155-62.

Effects of gender, apolipoprotein E phenotype and cholesterol-lowering by plant stanol esters in children: the STRIP study. Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project.

Author information

1
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. anne.tammi@utu.fi

Abstract

AIM:

To evaluate the effects of gender, apolipoprotein E phenotype and cholesterol absorption and synthesis (estimated as serum plant sterol and cholesterol precursor sterol concentrations) on the cholesterol-lowering effect of plant stanol esters in children.

METHODS:

Eighty-one healthy, normocholesterolaemic 6-y-old children (45 boys) were recruited from the Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP), a randomized prospective trial aiming at atherosclerosis prevention in childhood. This placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study comprised two 3-mo study periods and a 6-wk wash-out period. During the study periods, 20 g of the children's daily dietary fat intake was replaced with plant stanol ester margarine or control margarine.

RESULTS:

In boys, plant stanol esters reduced serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations by 6% (0.09 to 0.42 mmol/L) and 9% (0.09 to 0.36 mmol/L), respectively (p < 0.01 for both). In girls, the decreases in concentrations were 4% (0.03 to 0.38 mmol/L) and 6% (0.02 to 0.32 mmol/l) (p < 0.05 for both). The response rate did not differ between the genders. Serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations decreased by 6% and 8% (p < 0.01 for both), respectively, in both children with the apolipoprotein E 3/4 or 4/4 (apoE4+) phenotype and the apolipoprotein E 2/3 or 3/3 (apoE4-) phenotype. Cholesterol absorption decreased both in the apoE4+ children and in the apoE4- children, but cholesterol synthesis consistently increased in the apoE4+ children only.

CONCLUSION:

Plant stanol esters reduce serum cholesterol concentration in healthy children irrespective of their gender or apoE4 phenotype.

PMID:
12463311
DOI:
10.1080/080352502320777379
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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