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Dermatol Surg. 2002 Nov;28(11):1022-6.

Gravimetrically controlled efficacy of subcorial curettage: a prospective study for treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis.

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1
Department of Dermatology, University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany. Thomas.Proebstle@web.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) proved to be effective for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis by means of gravimetry. Quantitatively controlled studies for surgical treatment are lacking so far.

OBJECTIVE:

To prospectively test the efficacy of subcorial axillary curettage by gravimetric evaluation of pre- and postsurgical sweat rates.

METHODS:

Conservatively pretreated patients received subcorial curettage under tumescent local anesthesia using a sharp spoon. Sweat rates of each axilla were determined gravimetrically before and 4-8 weeks after surgery. Evaluation was performed with respect to baseline sweat rates greater than 50 mg/min (group A), greater than 25 and less than 50 mg/min (group B), and less than 25 mg/min (group C). Side effects and patients' ratings were also recorded.

RESULTS:

Of 42 treated patients, 38 could be evaluated completely. In 29 axillae of group A (high sweat rates), an average reduction from the baseline of 85.6 mg/min to 21.6 mg/min could be achieved (P <.0001). Corresponding values for 22 axillae of group B (medium sweat rates) were 36.8 mg/min and 16.5 mg/min (P <.0001). In 25 axillae with low sweat rates (group C), a significant reduction in sweat rates could not be achieved. The results remained almost stable during a median follow-up of 11 months (range 4-24 months). Only minor side effects were observed and patient satisfaction was high in groups A and B.

CONCLUSION:

Subcorial curettage is an effective treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis for patients with baseline sweat rates greater than 25 mg/min.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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