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Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2002 Dec;90(3-4):113-32.

FIV vaccine development and its importance to veterinary and human medicine: a review FIV vaccine 2002 update and review.

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1
Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, PO Box 110880, Gainesville, FL 32611-0880, USA.

Abstract

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a natural infection of domestic cats that results in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome resembling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans. The worldwide prevalence of FIV infection in domestic cats has been reported to range from 1 to 28%. Hence, an effective FIV vaccine will have an important impact on veterinary medicine in addition to being used as a small animal AIDS model for humans. Since the discovery of FIV reported in 1987, FIV vaccine research has pursued both molecular and conventional vaccine approaches toward the development of a commercial product. Published FIV vaccine trial results from 1998 to the present have been compiled to update the veterinary clinical and research communities on the immunologic and experimental efficacy status of these vaccines. A brief report is included on the outcome of the 10 years of collaborative work between industry and academia which led to recent USDA approval of the first animal lentivirus vaccine, the dual-subtype FIV vaccine. The immunogenicity and efficacy of the experimental prototype, dual-subtype FIV vaccine and the efficacy of the currently approved commercial, dual-subtype FIV vaccine (Fel-O-Vax FIV) are discussed. Potential cross-reactivity complications between commercial FIV diagnostic tests, Idexx Snap Combo Test and Western blot assays, and sera from previously vaccinated cats are also discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for unbiased critical testing of new FIV vaccines, the currently USDA approved vaccine, and future vaccines in development.

PMID:
12459160
DOI:
10.1016/s0165-2427(02)00227-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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