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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2002 Nov 15;221(10):1445-52.

Clinical features and outcome in dogs and cats with obsessive-compulsive disorder: 126 cases (1989-2000).

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1
Center for Neurobiology and Genetics-Psychiatry Department, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine clinical features and outcome in dogs and cats with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

DESIGN:

Retrospective study.

ANIMALS:

103 dogs and 23 cats.

PROCEDURES:

Records of patients with OCD were analyzed for clinical features, medication used, extent of behavior modification, and outcome.

RESULTS:

Most dogs affected with OCD had been obtained from breeders. Male dogs significantly outnumbered females (2:1). Female cats outnumbered male cats by 2:1 in a small sample. Most affected dogs lived in households with 2 or more humans and other dogs or cats, and had some formal training. Client compliance with behavior modification was high. A combination of behavior modification and medication resulted in a large decrease in intensity and frequency of OCD in most animals. Clomipramine was significantly more efficacious for treatment in dogs than was amitriptyline. Only 1 dog and 1 cat were euthanatized because of OCD during the study.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

OCD in dogs does not appear to be associated with lack of training, lack of household stimulation, or social confinement. In cats, OCD may be associated with environmental and social stress. Obsessive-compulsive disorder appears at the time of social maturity and may have sporadic and heritable forms. With appropriate treatment (consistent behavior modification and treatment with clomipramine), frequency and intensity of clinical signs in most dogs and cats may decrease by > 50%. Success appears to depend on client understanding and compliance and the reasonable expectation that OCD cannot be cured, but can be well controlled.

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PMID:
12458615
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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