Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Dermatol. 2002 Nov;138(11):1494-7.

Frequency of facial basal cell carcinoma does not correlate with site-specific UV exposure.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany. heckmann@derma.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer in whites. Long-term exposure to UV radiation is considered a major risk factor. We decided to investigate whether maximally exposed areas of the body are also the most frequent sites where BCCs develop.

DESIGN:

Retrospective analysis of distribution and histopathologic features of 3065 facial BCCs.

SETTING:

University hospital.

PATIENTS:

Patients with primary or recurrent BCC of the face.

INTERVENTION:

Exact topographic documentation followed by removal of BCC with Mohs prcedure and analysis of tumor extension.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

To test the hypothesis that site-specific UV exposure correlates with site-specific BCC frequency.

RESULTS:

The most frequent sites of BCC were the nose (n = 1373), orbital area (n = 386), and ears (n = 269). Subdivision of these anatomical units showed that most nasal BCCs are located at the base of the nose (n = 851), while the apex (n = 292) and the dorsum of the nose (n = 230) were less frequent sites despite their prominent sun exposure. The shaded retroauricular fold (n = 99) and the sun-exposed preauricular crest (n = 105) were similar in frequency of BCCs; fewer BCCs were located on the helix of the ears (n = 65). Finally, almost 10 times more BCCs were found in the medial quadrant of the orbit (n = 225) than in the lateral quadrant (n=24). No correlation between prominent UV-exposed facial contours and particular histologic features, such as solid, morpheaform, or adenoid-cystic, could be established.

CONCLUSIONS:

Site-specific cumulative UV exposure alone is a poor predictor of frequency or histologic features of BCC. Additional site-specific textural qualities of facial skin may be considered as potential cofactors for the development of BCC.

PMID:
12437456
DOI:
10.1001/archderm.138.11.1494
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center