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Surg Endosc. 2003 Mar;17(3):394-400. Epub 2002 Nov 20.

Surgical trial investigating nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux and sleep (STINGERS).

Author information

1
Section of Surgical Sciences, Division of General Surgery, Vanderbilt University, MCN D-5219, Nashville, TN 37232-2905, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nocturnal reflux is important in the pathogenesis of esophagitis. The relationship between reflux and sleep is poorly understood, although data support both paradigms of nocturnal reflux causing arousal and nocturnal arousal allowing reflux. Furthermore, the effect of fundoplication on sleep is unknown.

METHODS:

Seven volunteers and 11 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and nocturnal symptoms were studied with esophageal pH and polysomnography at baseline and at 8 to 10 weeks follow-up evaluation, with patients undergoing interval fundoplication. Gastrointestinal and sleep questionnaires were completed before each study.

RESULTS:

Questionnaire data between the groups showed differences at baseline, which were eliminated by surgery. No objective differences in sleep were observed between the groups at baseline or at follow-up evaluation. However, the patient group significantly increased the fraction of the night spent in deeper sleep (49.6% vs 58.3%; p = 0.022). Reflux events were associated with arousals in sleep.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fundoplication improves both subjective and objective sleep quality in patients with nocturnal GERD symptoms.

PMID:
12436237
DOI:
10.1007/s00464-002-8912-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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