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Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2002 Nov 29;197(1-2):117-25.

The role of luteinizing hormone in the pathogenesis of hyperadrenocorticism in neutered ferrets.

Author information

1
Division of Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. n.j.schoemaker@vet.uu.nl

Abstract

Four studies were performed to test the hypothesis that gonadotrophic hormones, and particularly luteinizing hormone (LH) play a role in the pathogenesis of ferrets: (I) adrenal glands of ferrets with hyperadrenocorticism were studied immunohistochemically to detect LH-receptors (LH-R); (II) gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation tests were performed in 10 neutered ferrets, with measurement of androstenedione, 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and cortisol as endpoints; (III) GnRH stimulation tests were performed in 15 ferrets of which 8 had hyperadrenocorticism, via puncture of the vena cava under anesthesia; and (IV) urinary corticoid/creatinine (C/C) ratios were measured at 2-week intervals for 1 year in the same ferrets as used in study II. Clear cells in hyperplastic or neoplastic adrenal glands of hyperadrenocorticoid ferrets stained positive with the LH-R antibody. Plasma androstenedione and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone concentrations increased after stimulation with GnRH in 7 out of 8 hyperadrenocorticoid ferrets but in only 1 out of 7 healthy ferrets. Hyperadrenocorticoid ferrets had elevated urinary C/C ratios during the breeding season. The observations support the hypothesis that gonadotrophic hormones play a role in the pathogenesis of hyperadrenocorticism in ferrets. This condition may be defined as a disease resulting from the expression of LH-R on sex steroid-producing adrenocortical cells.

PMID:
12431804
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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