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Med J Aust. 2002 Nov 18;177(10):548-51.

Appropriateness of red blood cell transfusion in Australasian intensive care practice.

Author information

1
Department of Intensive Care, Western Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. craig.french@wh.org.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the incidence and appropriateness of use of allogenic packed red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in Australian and New Zealand intensive care practice.

SETTING:

Intensive care units of 18 Australian and New Zealand hospitals: March 2001.

DESIGN:

Prospective, observational, multicentre study.

METHODS:

All admissions to participating intensive care units were screened and all patients who received a transfusion of RBC were enrolled. The indications for transfusion were recorded and compared with Australian National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines. Transfusions conforming to these guidelines were deemed appropriate.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

RBC transfusion in intensive care and transfusion appropriateness.

RESULTS:

1808 admissions to intensive care units were screened: 357 (19.8%) admissions (350 patients) received an RBC transfusion while in intensive care. Overall, 1464 RBC units were administered in intensive care on 576 transfusion days. The most common indications for transfusion were acute bleeding (60.1%; 880/1464) and diminished physiological reserve (28.9%; 423/1464). The rate of inappropriate transfusion was 3.0% (44/1464). Diminished physiological reserve with haemogloblin level > or = 100 g/L was the indication in 50% (22/44) of inappropriate transfusions; no indication was provided for 31% (15/44).

CONCLUSION:

The rate of inappropriate transfusion in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units in 2001 was remarkably low.

PMID:
12429003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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