Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2002 Sep;8(9):589-97.

Factors related to the chronicity and evolution of hepatitis C infection in patients co-infected by the human immunodeficiency virus.

Author information

1
Unidad de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario Puerta del Mar, Facultad de Medicina, Cádiz, Spain. joseantonio.giron@uca.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This work analyses the influence of immune status, serum human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load and hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes on the probability of resolution of HCV infection in HIV-co-infected patients, as well as the evolution of HCV viremia after antiretroviral therapy.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Forty-five patients with anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies were classified into two groups as a function of the positivity or persistent negativity of HCV RNA detection (active or recovered HCV infection, respectively). They were treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Serum HCV RNA was quantified by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. HCV genotypes were detected by line probe assay or by detection of type-specific antibodies.

RESULTS:

HCV RNA was detectable in 30 (66.6%) out of 45 HIV-infected patients. CD4+ T-cell counts, HIV viremia, or HCV genotypes were similar in patients with active or recovered HCV infection. Patients with active HCV infection had a non-significant decrease of HCV viremia during a follow-up of 12 months (from 6.15 +/- 6.32 to 5.96 +/- 6.05 log copies/mL). This was not influenced by baseline HCV or HIV viral load, HCV genotype, or CD4+ T-cell count. The non-significant decrease was present in patients with or without an immunological response to HAART.

CONCLUSION:

HCV genotypes, immune status, or serum HIV load did not influence the resolution or chronicity of HCV infection in HIV-co-infected individuals. A non-significant decrease of HCV viremia in these patients treated with combinations including antiproteases could be expected.

PMID:
12427219
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center