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Carcinogenesis. 2002 Nov;23(11):1781-9.

The major lipid peroxidation product, trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, preferentially forms DNA adducts at codon 249 of human p53 gene, a unique mutational hotspot in hepatocellular carcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Medicine, Pathology and Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, Tuxedo, NY 10987, USA.

Abstract

Trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a major electrophilic by-product of lipid peroxidation, is able to interact with DNA to form exocyclic guanine adducts. 4-HNE is a mutagen and a significant amount of 4-HNE-guanine adduct has been detected in normal cells. Recently, it has been reported that exposure of the wild-type p53 human lymphoblastoid cell line to 4-HNE causes a high frequency of G to T transversion mutations at the third base of codon 249 (-AGG*-) in the p53 gene, a mutational hotspot in human cancers, particularly hepatocellular carcinoma. These findings raise a possibility that 4-HNE could be an important etiological agent for human cancers that have a mutation at codon 249 of the p53 gene. However, to date, the sequence specificity of 4-HNE-DNA binding remains unclear due to the lack of methodology. To address this question, we have developed a method, using UvrABC nuclease, a nucleotide excision repair enzyme complex isolated from Escherichia coli, to map the distribution of 4-HNE-DNA adducts in human p53 gene at the nucleotide sequence level. We found that 4-HNE-DNA adducts are preferentially formed at the third base of codon 249 in the p53 gene. The preferential binding of 4-HNE was also observed at codon 174, which has the same sequence and the same nearest neighbor sequences (-GAGG*C-) as codon 249. These results suggest that 4-HNE may be an important etiological agent for human cancers that have a mutation at codon 249 of the p53 gene.

PMID:
12419825
DOI:
10.1093/carcin/23.11.1781
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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