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J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2002 Nov;15(11):1326-34.

Exercise echocardiography and thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography stress test for 5- and 10-year prognosis of mortality and specific cardiac events.

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1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA.

Abstract

Limited data suggest that stress myocardial perfusion imaging and stress echocardiography have similar prognostic value for composite cardiac events. However, it is not known whether exercise echocardiography and stress thallium are similar in their prediction of specific cardiac events, eg, death, sudden death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and congestive heart failure. A total of 206 patients undergoing stress echocardiography and thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography imaging during the same exercise test were followed-up for 5 and 10 years. Multivariate Cox regression analyses incorporating clinical, exercise stress test, echocardiographic, and nuclear imaging parameters were used to predict mortality and specific cardiac events. A moderate to large amount of ischemia (> or =4 segments on the basis of a 16-segment model) by exercise stress echocardiography was the strongest predictor of overall mortality (relative risk [RR] 6.2; P <.0001), cardiac death (RR 17.6; P =.01), congestive heart failure (RR 17.4; P =.0005) or sudden death (RR 26.8; P =.003), whereas a moderate to large fixed defect (> or =2 segments on the basis of a 6-segment model) by nuclear imaging was the strongest predictor of myocardial infarction (RR 8.1; P =.0002) or unstable angina (RR 3.0; P =.005) at 5 years. The heterogeneity in the prediction of these specific cardiac events by these 2 modalities was similarly observed at 10 years. The extent of ischemia by stress echocardiography is a better predictor of overall mortality, cardiac death, congestive heart failure, or sudden death, whereas the extent of a fixed defect by nuclear imaging is a better predictor of myocardial infarction or unstable angina.

PMID:
12415225
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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