Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Hepatol. 2002 Nov;37(5):592-600.

Prospective surveillance of acute serious liver disease unrelated to infectious, obstructive, or metabolic diseases: epidemiological and clinical features, and exposure to drugs.

Author information

  • 1Fundació Institut Català de Farmacologia, Barcelona, Spain. li@icf.uab.es

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Acute serious liver disease which is unrelated to infectious, obstructive, or metabolic disease is uncommon. Many drugs have been implicated. Data on its epidemiology are scarce. We performed a population-based prospective study of acute serious liver disease in Catalonia (Spain).

METHODS:

A collaborating hospital network was set up. All patients with acute serious liver disease and negative viral hepatitis serological markers, without an obvious cause of liver disease, were included.

RESULTS:

The incidence of acute serious liver disease was 7.4 per 10(6) inhabitants per year (95% CI; 6.0-8.8), which increased with age. The incidence of hepatocellular acute serious liver disease (3.84 per 10(6) per year) was greater than that of cholestatic and mixed patterns. The case-fatality ratio was 11.9% and mortality 0.8 per million person-years. The risk of death was similar among patients with hepatocellular and cholestatic patterns. Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, analgesics, and antibacterials were the most frequently used drugs.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acute serious liver disease which is unrelated to infectious, obstructive, or metabolic disease is rare. Its incidence increases with age. The prognosis of cholestatic acute serious liver disease does not significantly differ from that of the hepatocellular pattern. Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, analgesics, and antibacterials were the most common drugs likely to be responsible for acute liver disease.

Copyright 2002 European Association for the Study of the Liver

Comment in

PMID:
12399224
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk