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J Biol Chem. 2002 Dec 13;277(50):48303-10. Epub 2002 Oct 10.

Selective association of TRPC channel subunits in rat brain synaptosomes.

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1
Rammelkamp Center for Education and Research, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44109, USA.

Abstract

TRPC genes encode a ubiquitous family of ion channel proteins responsible for Ca(2+) influx following stimulation of G-protein-coupled membrane receptors linked to phospholipase C. These channels may be localized to large multimeric signaling complexes via association with PDZ-containing scaffolding proteins. Based on sequence homology, the TRPC channel family can be divided into two major subgroups: TRPC1, -C4, and -C5 and TRPC3, -C6, and -C7. Although TRPC channels are thought to be tetramers, the actual subunit composition remains unknown. To determine subunit arrangement, individual TRPC channel pairs were heterologously expressed in Sf9 insect cells and immunoprecipitated using affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies specific for each channel subtype. Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitations showed that TRPC1, -C4, and -C5 co-associate and that TRPC3, -C6, and -C7 co-associate but that cross-association between the two major subgroups does not occur. Additionally, the interaction between each TRPC channel and the PDZ-containing protein, INAD (protein responsible for the inactivation-no-after-potential Drosophila mutant), was examined. TRPC1, -C4, and -C5 co-immunoprecipitated with INAD, whereas TRPC3, -C6, and -C7 did not. To define channel subunit interactions in vivo, immunoprecipitations were performed from isolated rat brain synaptosomal preparations. The results revealed that TRPC1, -C4, and -C5 co-associate and that TRPC3, -C6, and -C7 co-associate in both cortex and cerebellum but that cross-association between the two major subgroups does not occur. These results demonstrate that TRPC channels are present in nerve terminals and provide the first direct evidence for selective assembly of channel subunits in vivo.

PMID:
12377790
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M207882200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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