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Eur J Pediatr. 2002 Oct;161 Suppl 1:S65-9. Epub 2002 Jul 13.

Disturbed lipid metabolism in glycogen storage disease type 1.

Author information

1
Centre for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases, Room Y2117, CMCIV, University Hospital Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, PO Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen The Netherlands. R.H.J.Bandsma@med.rug.nl

Abstract

Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase, the enzyme catalysing the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) to glucose. GSD1 is associated with severe hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis. The underlying mechanisms responsible for these abnormalities in lipid metabolism are only partly known. This review summarises data available on hyperlipidaemia and steatosis in GSD1 and postulates new hypotheses for unresolved issues. Evidence indicates that lipid clearance from the blood compartment is decreased in GSD1. Furthermore, in two GSD1a patients synthesis of palmitate, an indicator of de novo lipogenesis, and cholesterol were found to be increased 40-fold and 7-fold, respectively. Elevated hepatic G6P levels may play a regulatory role in lipid synthesis via activation of transcription of lipogenic genes. In addition, accelerated glycolysis will supply acetyl-CoA molecules required for lipogenesis. It is as yet unclear whether hepatic secretion of lipids in the form of very low density lipoprotein-triglycerides (VLDL-TG) is altered in GSD1 patients: we recently found unaffected VLDL-TG secretion rates in an acute animal model of GSD1b. Hepatic steatosis, which is invariably present in GSD1 is probably mainly caused by an increased free fatty acid flux from adipose tissue to the liver and, to a limited extent, by increased de novo lipogenesis.

CONCLUSION:

future studies, using novel stable isotope methodologies, are warranted to further clarify the disturbances in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in glycogen storage disease type 1 and the role of glucose-6-phosphate herein.

PMID:
12373575
DOI:
10.1007/s00431-002-1007-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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