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Am J Gastroenterol. 2002 Sep;97(9):2225-30.

Gastric distension and duodenal lipid infusion modulate intestinal gas transit and tolerance in humans.

Author information

1
Digestive System Research Unit, Hospital General Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Patients with unexplained abdominal complaints often attribute their symptoms to intestinal gas and indicate that symptoms are exacerbated by ingestion of a meal. However, the mechanisms responsible are unknown. Our aim was to analyze the specific influence of two meal-related factors, gastric distension, and intestinal nutrients, on intestinal gas dynamics and tolerance.

METHODS:

In 35 healthy subjects, gas evacuation and perception of jejunal gas infusion (12 ml/min) were measured for 3 h, during simultaneous duodenal infusion of saline, as control, lipids at 1 Kcal/min, or gastric distension.

RESULTS:

Infusion of lipids into the duodenum induced gas retention (584 +/- 154 ml, p < 0.05 vs 161 +/- 86 ml after saline infusion) without perception (2.2 +/- 0.5 score), whereas gastric distension induced perception (score 5.6 +/- 0.4, p < 0.05 vs score 1.9 +/- 0.4 after saline) without gas retention (7 +/- 205 ml).

CONCLUSIONS:

Different meal-related factors exert specific effects on intestinal gas dynamics and tolerance, and these mechanisms may interact to produce postprandial gas symptoms.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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