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Bol Asoc Chil Prot Fam. 1989 Jan-Jun;25(1-6):7-11.

[Knowledge about sexuality in university students].

[Article in Spanish]

Abstract

PIP:

This study explores the level of sexual knowledge among chilean university students in 4 different professions, compares their responses and verifies them with selected socio-demographic variables. 813 university students were interviewed in 1st and 3rd year medical school, law and engineering from the University of Chile and in education, from the Superior Blas Canas Institute of Pedagogy. The group is equally divided between each of the 4 professions; 64.7% are men with 95.5% single and 84.7% are between 17.22; only 37.5% attended a mixed school; 73.1% are Catholic. The survey aimed to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) but this article only analyzes the attitudes of students through 6 variables: anatomy and physiology, pregnancy and delivery, contraception, venereal diseases, sources claimed by the interviewee to receive information and self-evaluation of actual levels of knowledge. Results demonstrated knowledge about anatomy and physiology, pregnancy and delivery and venereal diseases, but great disparity with contraception. Students are not learning about methods of contraception in school, possibly due to fear on the part of the faculty or their own lack of information. 3 factors influenced levels of knowledge: 1) formal education; 2) experience; and 3) personal interest. The highest results were from students of medicine with the lowest being students in engineering and education. Those that were in their 3rd year of school or married appeared more knowledgeable possibly due to more sexual experience and the need to prevent pregnancies. The females in all variables scored higher due to their own interest in preventing pregnancies, and because women are socialized in interpersonal relations and maternity issues. More than 1/2 the students gave themselves bad evaluations concerning their levels of sexual knowledge.

PMID:
12315986
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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