Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur Urol. 2002 Sep;42(3):289-96.

The effect of different diets on urine composition and the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation in healthy subjects.

Author information

1
Division of Experimental Urology, Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Street, 25, D-53105, Bonn, Germany. roswitha.siener@ukb.uni-bonn.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to determine the impact of defined diet modifications on urine composition and the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation.

METHODS:

Ten healthy male volunteers consumed a self-selected diet (SD) for 14 days, and three different standard diets for a period of 5 days each. Whereas the western-type diet (WD) is representative of the usual dietary habits, the normal mixed diet (ND) and the ovo-lacto-vegetarian diet (VD) were calculated according to the requirements.

RESULTS:

The risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation, calculated as relative supersaturation (EQUIL2) from urine composition, was highest during ingestion of diets SD and WD. The intake of diet ND resulted in a significant decrease in relative supersaturation with calcium oxalate by 58% (p<0.05) compared with diet WD, due to a significant decline in urinary calcium and uric acid excretion and a significant increase in urinary volume, pH-value and citrate excretion. In spite of an increase in urinary pH, citrate and magnesium excretion and a decline in calcium excretion, no further significant decrease in the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation was observed on diet VD, due to a significant increase in urinary oxalate by 30% (p<0.05) on average.

CONCLUSIONS:

The change of usual dietary habits for a normal mixed diet significantly reduces the risk of calcium oxalate crystallisation. With a vegetarian diet a similar decline in urinary supersaturation with calcium oxalate can be achieved compared to a normal mixed diet. Since urinary oxalate excretion increased significantly, a vegetarian diet without adequate intake of calcium may not be recommended to patients with mild hyperoxaluria.

PMID:
12234515
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center