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J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2002 Aug;30(4):237-41.

Paediatric maxillofacial fractures: their aetiological characters and fracture patterns.

Author information

1
First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Osaka, Japan. iida@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Paediatric maxillofacial fractures are not common and carry different clinical features when compared with adults. To clarify the differences of aetiology and patterns of fractures in paediatric patients, a clinical retrospective analysis was performed.

PATIENTS:

One hundred seventy-four paediatric patients younger than 16 years of age treated in the First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Osaka University Dental Hospital during a 15-year period were analysed.

STUDY DESIGN:

Age, sex, fracture patterns, incidence, common locations of the mandibular fractures and treatment were studied according to the patients' charts and radiographs.

RESULTS:

The ratio of boys to girls was 2:1 and the largest age subgroup was 15-years old. The most common cause of injury was bicycle accidents (26%), followed by falls (25%). The distribution of causes and ages revealed that the incidence of the fall-related injuries decreased in patients older than 10 years, and assaults became a common cause in patients older than 12 years. The yearly distribution showed a decrease of the group between 6 and 10 years and of bicycle-related accidents in the last 5-year period (1992-1996). Mandibular fractures were most common (56%), followed by fractures of the alveolar process (31%). Condylar fracture was common in children younger than 14 years, especially in those below 6 years. Fractures of the mandibular angle were the most common in those above 13 years.

CONCLUSION:

These results document that the aetiological characters and patterns of paediatric maxillofacial fractures gradually shifted towards those found in adolescents.

PMID:
12231205
DOI:
10.1054/jcms.2002.0295
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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