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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Sep;34(9):1485-91.

Effect of increased fat availability on metabolism and exercise capacity.

Author information

1
Exercise Metabolism Group, School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia. john.hawley@rmit.edu.au

Abstract

Several procedures have been utilized to elevate plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration and increase fatty acid (FA) delivery to skeletal muscle during exercise. These include fasting, caffeine ingestion, L-carnitine supplementation, ingestion of medium-chain and long-chain triglyceride (LCT) solutions, and intravenous infusion of intralipid emulsions. Studies in which both untrained and well-trained subjects have ingested LCT solutions or received an infusion of intralipid (in combination with an injection of heparin) before exercise have reported significant reductions in whole-body carbohydrate oxidation and decreased muscle glycogen utilization during both moderate and intense dynamic exercise lasting 15-60 min. The effects of increased FA provision on rates of muscle glucose uptake during exercise are, however, equivocal. Despite substantial muscle glycogen sparing (15-48% compared with control), exercise capacity is not systematically improved in the face of increased FA availability.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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