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Head Neck. 2002 Sep;24(9):821-9.

Malignant tumors of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Science Center, P. O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the role of radiation therapy in patients with nasal cavity and paranasal sinus tumors.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Between October 1964 and July 1998, 78 patients with malignant tumors of the nasal cavity (48 patients), ethmoid sinus (24 patients), sphenoid sinus (5 patients), or frontal sinus (1 patient) were treated with curative intent by radiation therapy alone or in the adjuvant setting. There were 25 squamous cell carcinomas, 14 undifferentiated carcinomas, 31 minor salivary gland tumors (adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and mucoepidermoid carcinoma), 8 esthesioneuroblastomas, and 1 transitional cell carcinoma. Forty-seven patients were treated with irradiation alone, 25 with surgery and postoperative irradiation, 2 with preoperative irradiation and surgery, and 4 with chemotherapy in combination with irradiation with or without surgery.

RESULTS:

The 5-year actuarial local control rate for stage I (limited to the site of origin; 22 patients) was 86%; for stage II (extension to adjacent sites (eg, adjacent sinuses, orbit, pterygomaxillary fossa, nasopharynx; 21 patients) was 65%; and for stage III (destruction of skull base or pterygoid plates, or intracranial extension; 35 patients) was 34%. The 5-year actuarial local control rate for patients receiving postoperative irradiation was 79% and for patients receiving irradiation alone was 49% (p =.05). The 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year ultimate local control rates for all 78 patients were 60%, 56%, 48%, and 48%, respectively. The 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year cause-specific survival rates for all 78 patients were 56%, 45%, 39%, and 39%, respectively. The 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year absolute survival rates for all 78 patients were 50%, 31%, 21%, and 16%, respectively. Of the 67 (86%) patients who were initially seen with node-negative disease, 39 (58%) received no elective neck treatment, and 28 (42%) received elective neck irradiation. Of the 39 patients who received no elective neck treatment, 33 (85%) did not experience recurrence in the neck compared with 25 (89%) of 28 patients who received elective neck irradiation. Most patients who received elective neck irradiation (57%) had stage III disease. Twenty-one (27%) of 78 patients had unilateral blindness develop secondary to radiation retinopathy or optic neuropathy; the complication was anticipated in most of these patients, because the ipsilateral eye was irradiated to a high dose. Four patients (5%) unexpectedly had bilateral blindness develop because of optic neuropathy. All four of these patients received irradiation alone.

CONCLUSION:

Surgery and postoperative radiation therapy may result in improved local control, absolute survival, and complications when compared with radiation therapy alone. Elective neck irradiation is probably unnecessary for patients with early-stage disease.

PMID:
12211046
DOI:
10.1002/hed.10143
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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