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Arthritis Rheum. 2002 Aug;47(4):366-71.

Racial differences in social network experience and perceptions of benefit of arthritis treatments among New York City Medicare beneficiaries with self-reported hip and knee pain.

Author information

1
North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, New York, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether social network experience and perceptions of benefit of arthritis treatments influence the decision to seek diagnosis and treatment.

METHODS:

A population-based telephone survey of 515 black and 455 white Medicare beneficiaries was conducted. Validated questionnaires adapted for use in a telephone interview were used to identify people with self-reported symptoms of hip or knee pain. Treatment history for arthritis-related pain and perceptions of benefit of treatment were also assessed.

RESULTS:

Forty-two percent of blacks and 31% of whites reported hip or knee pain. Forty-two percent of blacks and 65% of whites reported knowing someone who had surgery for hip or knee pain (P < 0.0001). Blacks were less likely than whites to report that surgery had helped someone they knew with hip or knee pain (not significant).

CONCLUSION:

Blacks know fewer people who have had surgical treatment of hip and knee pain than whites and appear to be less likely to perceive that such treatment is beneficial.

PMID:
12209481
DOI:
10.1002/art.10538
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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