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Prev Med. 2002 Aug;35(2):174-80.

Sociodemographic variations in breast cancer screening behavior among Australian women: results from the 1995 National Health Survey.

Author information

1
VicHealth Centre for Tobacco Control, The Cancer Council Victoria, Carlton, Australia. mohammad.siahpush@accv.org.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Knowledge of sociodemographic variations in breast cancer screening can help identify population groups that are at risk of underutilization of breast cancer screening procedures and practices. We examined sociodemographic variations in breast cancer screening behavior among Australian women.

METHODS:

We used a subsample of women aged 18 years and older (n = 10,179) from the 1995 National Health Survey. We examined the association of sociodemographic variables with mammography, clinical breast examination, and breast self-examination.

RESULTS:

Being in the oldest age group, never being or previously being married, living in rural regions (except in the case of breast self-examination), residing in more disadvantaged areas (except in the case of breast self-examination), and having lower levels of education were all associated with a smaller likelihood of screening. Ethnicity was also significantly associated with screening.

CONCLUSION:

Strategies to promote breast cancer screening practices should pay particular attention to the underserved groups and should be part of a more comprehensive policy that ensures the accessibility to regular health care of these population groups.

PMID:
12200103
DOI:
10.1006/pmed.2002.1063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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