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Am J Public Health. 2002 Sep;92(9):1421-9.

Occupational injury and illness surveillance: conceptual filters explain underreporting.

Author information

1
Department of Work Environment, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA 01854, USA. lenore_azaroff@uml.edu.

Abstract

Occupational health surveillance data are key to effective intervention. However, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics survey significantly underestimates the incidence of work-related injuries and illnesses. Researchers supplement these statistics with data from other systems not designed for surveillance. The authors apply the filter model of Webb et al. to underreporting by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, workers' compensation wage-replacement documents, physician reporting systems, and medical records of treatment charged to workers' compensation. Mechanisms are described for the loss of cases at successive steps of documentation. Empirical findings indicate that workers repeatedly risk adverse consequences for attempting to complete these steps, while systems for ensuring their completion are weak or absent.

PMID:
12197968
PMCID:
PMC1447253
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.92.9.1421
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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