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Gastrointest Endosc. 2002 Sep;56(3):333-8.

Total colonic dye-spray increases the detection of diminutive adenomas during routine colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Wolfson Unit for Endoscopy and Imperial Cancer Research Fund, St Mark's Hospital, Northwick Park, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Small adenomas may be missed during colonoscopy, but chromoscopy has been reported to enhance detection. The aim of this randomized-controlled trial was to determine the effect of total colonic dye spray on adenoma detection during routine colonoscopy.

METHODS:

Consecutive outpatients undergoing routine colonoscopy were randomized to a dye-spray group (0.1% indigo carmine used to coat the entire colon during withdrawal from the cecum) or control group (no dye).

RESULTS:

Two hundred fifty-nine patients were randomized, 124 to the dye-spray and 135 to the control group; demographics, indication for colonoscopy, and quality of the preparation were similar between the groups. Extubation from the cecum took a median of 9:05 minutes (range: 2:48-24:44 min) in the dye-spray group versus 4:52 minutes (range: 1:42-15:21 min) in the control group (p < 0.0001). The proportion of patients with at least 1 adenoma and the total number of adenomas were not different between groups. However, in the dye-spray group significantly more diminutive adenomas (<5 mm) were detected proximal to the sigmoid colon (p = 0.026) and more patients were identified with 3 or more adenomas (p = 0.002). More non-neoplastic polyps were detected throughout the colon in the dye-spray group (p = 0.003). There were no complications.

CONCLUSIONS:

Dye-spray increases the detection of small adenomas in the proximal colon and patients with multiple adenomas, but long-term outcomes should be studied to determine the clinical value of these findings.

PMID:
12196768
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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