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Gender and age-specific first incidence of DSM-III-R psychiatric disorders in the general population. Results from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

Author information

1
WODC (Research and Documentation Centre, Ministry of Justice), P. O. Box 20301, 2500 EH The Hague, The Netherlands. rbijl@best-dep.minjus.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prospective studies in the general population are needed to identify risk factors for mental disorders. Samples of sufficient size are needed, but large-scale studies that assess the incidence of psychopathology are rare.

AIMS:

The aim of this study was to investigate the 12-month first incidence rates (IR) by age and gender for 15 specified DSM-III-R disorders in the general population. Methods The study was based on a representative sample (N = 5618) of the Dutch population aged 18-64.

RESULTS:

The IR for any disorder was 5.68 per 100 person-years at risk (men 4.45, women 6.94). IRs for both men and women were highest in the youngest age category. The most common 12-month incident disorders in men were alcohol abuse (IR = 4.09) and major depression (1.72). In women, the most common incident disorders were major depression (IR = 3.90) and simple phobia (3.17).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results show the rarity of first-onset of mental disorders. IRs vary strongly between the different life phases, as well as between men and women. This suggests potential target areas for age-specific and gender-specific prevention.

PMID:
12195544
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-002-0566-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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