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Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;8(9):966-70.

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in institutionalized adults with developmental disabilities.

Author information

1
Soroka University Medical Center and the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Isreal.

Abstract

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has recently been reported to emerge in the community setting. We describe the investigation and control of a community-acquired outbreak of MRSA skin infections in a closed community of institutionalized adults with developmental disabilities. In a 9-month period in 1997, 20 (71%) of 28 residents had 73 infectious episodes. Of the cultures, 60% and 32% obtained from residents and personnel, respectively, grew S. aureus; 96% and 27% were MRSA. All isolates were genetically related by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and belonged to a phage type not previously described in the region. No known risk factors for MRSA acquisition were found. However, 58 antibiotic courses had been administered to 16 residents during the preceding 9 months. Infection control measures, antibiotic restriction, and appropriate therapy resulted in successful termination of this outbreak. Selective antibiotic pressure may result in the emergence, persistence, and dissemination of MRSA strains, causing prolonged disease.

PMID:
12194775
PMCID:
PMC2732561
DOI:
10.3201/eid0809.020300
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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