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Diabetologia. 2002 Aug;45(8):1128-35. Epub 2002 Jun 22.

Insulin signal transduction and glucose transport in human adipocytes: effects of obesity and low calorie diet.

Author information

1
Section of Integrative Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

AIM/HYPOTHESIS:

We examined insulin signal transduction at the level of insulin receptor substrates (IRS) 1 and 2, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and glucose transport in isolated subcutaneous adipocytes from obese and lean women.

METHODS:

Glucose transport and insulin signalling were investigated in isolated adipocytes from six obese women (BMI 36-43 kg/m(2)) (before and after 11 days of very low calorie diet) and from six lean women (BMI 22-26 kg/m(2)).

RESULTS:

Insulin sensitivity of glucose transport was reduced in adipocytes from obese women (p<0.05), with further reductions in basal and maximal insulin-stimulated glucose transport after a very low calorie diet (p<0.05). In obese women, IRS-1 associated PI 3-kinase activity was markedly impaired (p<0.05), whereas, IRS-2 associated PI 3-kinase activity was normal. IRS-1 associated PI 3-kinase activity remained blunted after a very low calorie diet, whereas IRS-2 associated PI 3-kinase activity was increased. GLUT4 protein was reduced by 37% in obese versus lean subjects (p<0.05), and decreased further after a very low calorie diet (from 19+/-4 to 14+/-4 arbitrary units; p<0.05).

CONCLUSION/INTERPRETATION:

IRS-1 signalling to PI 3-kinase is a site of insulin resistance in adipocytes from obese women, whereas insulin action on IRS-2 is normal. Thus, IRS-1 and IRS-2 undergo differential regulation in adipocytes from obese insulin resistant subjects. Finally, a very low calorie diet is associated with a further impairment in glucose transport in adipose tissue. The defect in glucose transport after a very low calorie diet occurs independent of further defects in insulin signalling at the level of the PI 3-kinase.

PMID:
12189443
DOI:
10.1007/s00125-002-0875-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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