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AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2002 Sep;179(3):783-9.

Using relative cerebral blood flow and volume to evaluate the histopathologic grade of cerebral gliomas: preliminary results.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Relative cerebral blood flow has rarely been studied as part of the preoperative assessment of tumor grade, although relative cerebral blood volume is known to be useful for this assessment. The purpose of our study was to determine the usefulness of relative cerebral blood flow in assessing the histopathologic grade of cerebral gliomas.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

MR imaging was performed in 17 patients with proven cerebral gliomas (11 high-grade gliomas and six low-grade gliomas), using a first-pass gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced T2-weighted echoplanar perfusion sequence. The perfusion data were deconvoluted with an arterial input function, using singular value decomposition to obtain a color map of relative cerebral blood volume and flow; the relative cerebral blood volume and flow ratios were expressed relative to values measured in the contralateral white matter. The Wilcoxon's rank sum test was performed to test the difference between the mean of the relative cerebral blood volume (or flow) ratio in high-grade gliomas and that in low-grade gliomas. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to evaluate the association between the relative cerebral blood volume (or flow) ratio and the grade of the glioma, as well as to calculate the relative cerebral blood volume and flow ratio cutoff value permitting discrimination between high- and low-grade gliomas. The correlation between relative cerebral blood volume and flow ratios was evaluated using Spearman's rank correlation analysis. We also made a qualitative assessment regarding the match or mismatch of areas of maximal contrast enhancement with the areas of highest color perfusion maps.

RESULTS:

The mean of the relative cerebral blood volume ratio was 4.91 in the high-grade gliomas and 2.00 in the low-grade gliomas. The mean relative cerebral blood flow ratio was 4.82 in the high-grade gliomas and 1.83 in the low-grade gliomas. A significant difference in each relative cerebral blood volume and flow ratio was found between the high- and low-grade gliomas (Wilcoxon's rank sum test, p < 0.05). Both the relative cerebral blood volume and flow ratios strongly matched the grade of the glioma, but the difference between the two areas was not significant (receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, p > 0.05). The desired cutoff value was 2.93 in the relative cerebral blood volume ratio and 3.57 in the relative cerebral blood flow ratio. Additionally, there was a strong correlation between the relative cerebral blood volume and flow ratios (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient = 0.762; p < 0.05). There was frequent mismatch (33%) between the qualitative assessment of the contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images and the perfusion maps.

CONCLUSION:

First-pass gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced T2-weighted echoplanar perfusion MR imaging is useful for the preoperative assessment of tumor grade. A relative cerebral blood flow ratio, in addition to a relative cerebral blood volume ratio, can be a useful tool in the evaluation of the histopathologic grade of cerebral gliomas.

PMID:
12185064
DOI:
10.2214/ajr.179.3.1790783
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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