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Pharm Res. 2002 Jul;19(7):1038-45.

Differential modulation of P-glycoprotein expression and activity by non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors in cell culture.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutic Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study investigated the effects of the non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) nevirapine (NVR), efavirenz (EFV), and delavirdine (DLV) on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity and expression to anticipate P-gp related drug-drug interactions associated with combination therapy.

METHODS:

NNRTIs were evaluated as P-gp substrates by measuring differential transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Inhibition of P-gp mediated rhodaminel23 (Rh123) transport in Caco-2 cells was used to assess P-gp inhibition by NNRTIs. Induction of P-gp expression and activity in LS180V cells following 3-day exposure to NNRTIs was measured by western blot analysis and cellular Rh123 uptake, respectively.

RESULTS:

The NNRTIs showed no differential transport between the basolateral to apical and apical to basolateral direction. NNRTI transport in either direction was not affected by the P-gp inhibitor verapamil. DLV inhibited Rh123 transport, causing a reduction to 15% of control at 100 microM (IC50 = 30 microM). NVR caused a concentration-dependent induction of P-gp expression in LS180V cells resulting in a 3.5-fold increase in immunoreactive P-gp at 100 microM NVR. Induction attributable to EFV and DLV was quantitatively smaller. NVR significantly reduced cellular uptake of Rh123 into LS180V cells, indicating increased drug efflux due to induced P-gp activity; effects of EFV and DLV were smaller. Acute DLV treatment of LS180V cells previously induced with NVR or ritonavir did not reverse the decreased Rh123 cell accumulation.

CONCLUSIONS:

NNRTIs show differential effects on P-gp activity and expression in vitro. Clinical studies are required to elucidate the clinical importance of potential drug interactions.

PMID:
12180537
DOI:
10.1023/a:1016430825740
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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