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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2002 Aug;83(8):1138-44.

Reliability and comparison of weight-bearing ability during standing tasks for individuals with chronic stroke.

Author information

1
School of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Janicee@interchange.ubc.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the test-retest reliability over 2 separate days for weight-bearing ability during standing tasks in individuals with chronic stroke and to compare the weight-bearing ability among 5 standing tasks for the paretic and nonparetic limbs.

DESIGN:

Prospective study using a convenient sample.

SETTING:

Free-standing tertiary rehabilitation center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Fifteen community-dwelling stroke individuals with moderate motor deficits; volunteer sample.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Weight-bearing ability as measured by the vertical ground reaction force during 5 standing tasks (rising from a chair, quiet standing, weight-shifting forward, backward, laterally).

RESULTS:

The weight-bearing ability was less for the paretic limb compared with the nonparetic limb, but the intraclass correlation coefficients were high (.95-.99) for both limbs between the 2 sessions for all 5 tasks. The forward weight-shifting ability was particularly low in magnitude on the paretic side compared with the other weight-shifting tasks. In addition, the forward weight-shift ability of the nonparetic limb was also impaired but to a lesser extent. Large asymmetry was evident when rising from a chair, with the paretic limb bearing a mean 296N and the nonparetic side bearing a mean 458N. The weight-bearing ability during all 5 tasks correlated with one another (r range,.56-.94).

CONCLUSIONS:

Weight-bearing ability can be reliably measured and may serve as a useful outcome measure in individuals with stroke. We suggest that impairments of the hemiparetic side during forward weight shifting and sit-to-stand tasks presents a challenge to the motor systems of individuals with stroke, which may account for the poor balance that is often observed in these individuals.

PMID:
12161837
PMCID:
PMC3501528
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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