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Am J Cardiol. 2002 Aug 15;90(4):374-8.

Technical feasibility, safety, and clinical outcome of stenting of unprotected left main coronary artery bifurcation narrowing.

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1
Department of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

This study was performed to evaluate the acute and long-term results of stenting for unprotected left main coronary artery (LMCA) bifurcation lesions. Sixty-three consecutive patients with an unprotected LMCA bifurcation lesion and normal left ventricular function were included. Stenting was performed with (n = 32) or without debulking atherectomy (n = 31) at the operator's discretion. Slotted-tube stents, coil stents, or bifurcation stents were used. The procedural success rate was 100%. In-hospital events including stent thrombosis, Q-wave myocardial infarction, and emergency bypass surgery did not occur in any patients. The angiographic follow-up rate was 86% (43 of the 50 eligible patients), and the restenosis rate was 28% (parent vessel only 14%, side branch only 9%, and both 5%). Restenosis at the parent vessel occurred less frequently in the debulking group than in the nondebulking group (5% vs 33%, respectively, p = 0.02). In multivariate analysis, the debulking procedure was an independent predictive factor of restenosis for the parent vessel (odds ratio 0.10, 95% confidence intervals 0.01 to 0.91, p = 0.04). Clinical follow-up was obtained in all patients at 19.9 +/- 13.7 months. There were 2 deaths (noncardiac origin), but no myocardial infarction during follow-up. Target lesion revascularization was required in 6 patients. The event-free survival rate (death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and repeat revascularization) was 86% at the end of the follow-up period. In conclusion, stenting for an unprotected LMCA bifurcation lesion may be performed with a high procedural success rate and a favorable clinical outcome in selected patients with normal left ventricular function, suggesting that stenting would be an effective alternative to surgery in these patients.

PMID:
12161225
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9149(02)02492-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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