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Mutat Res. 2002 Aug 26;519(1-2):93-101.

Effects on sister chromatid exchange frequency of polymorphisms in DNA repair gene XRCC1 in smokers.

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1
Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, No. 1 Ren-Ai Road, Sec. 1, 10018 Taipei, ROC.

Abstract

The association between metabolic polymorphisms and cigarette smoking-induced cancers has been documented. However, the role of DNA repair polymorphism in carcinogenesis is less clear. To investigate if the polymorphisms of metabolic traits and DNA repair modulate smoking-related DNA damage, we used sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as a marker of genetic damage to explore the relationship of microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), and X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and cigarette smoking-induced SCE. Sixty-one workers without significant exposure to mutagens were recruited. Questionnaires were completed to obtain detailed occupational, smoking, and medical histories. SCE frequency in peripheral lymphocytes was determined using a standard cytogenetic assay and GSTM1, mEH (exons 3 and 4), XRCC1 (codon 399) genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP). Smokers had higher SCE frequency than non-smokers (8.4 versus 7.1, P<0.05). Among workers who had smoked equal to or greater than 10 cigarettes each day, those with XRCC1 Arg/Gln+Gln/Gln had higher SCE frequency than those with XRCC1 Arg/Arg after adjusting for potential confounders (9.0 versus 7.9, P<0.05). The interaction of XRCC1 and cigarettes smoked per day on SCE frequency was also observed (P=0.02). There was no significant interaction between cigarettes smoked per day with GSTM1 and mEH on SCE frequency. Our results support previous epidemiological studies that XRCC1 may play a role in cigarette smoking-induced lung cancer.

PMID:
12160895
DOI:
10.1016/s1383-5718(02)00127-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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