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Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Aug;8(8):833-41.

Passive antibody administration (immediate immunity) as a specific defense against biological weapons.

Author information

1
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461, USA. casadeva@aecom.yu.edu

Abstract

The potential threat of biological warfare with a specific agent is proportional to the susceptibility of the population to that agent. Preventing disease after exposure to a biological agent is partially a function of the immunity of the exposed individual. The only available countermeasure that can provide immediate immunity against a biological agent is passive antibody. Unlike vaccines, which require time to induce protective immunity and depend on the host's ability to mount an immune response, passive antibody can theoretically confer protection regardless of the immune status of the host. Passive antibody therapy has substantial advantages over antimicrobial agents and other measures for postexposure prophylaxis, including low toxicity and high specific activity. Specific antibodies are active against the major agents of bioterrorism, including anthrax, smallpox, botulinum toxin, tularemia, and plague. This article proposes a biological defense initiative based on developing, producing, and stockpiling specific antibody reagents that can be used to protect the population against biological warfare threats.

PMID:
12141970
PMCID:
PMC3369592
DOI:
10.3201/eid0808.010516
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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