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Biochemistry. 2002 Jul 30;41(30):9525-34.

Evidence for a novel, strongly bound acto-S1 complex carrying ADP and phosphate stabilized in the G680V mutant of Dictyostelium myosin II.

Author information

1
Gene Discovery Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562, Japan. t-uyeda@aist.go.jp

Abstract

Gly 680 of Dictyostelium myosin II sits at a critical position within the reactive thiol helices. We have previously shown that G680V mutant subfragment 1 largely remains in strongly actin-bound states in the presence of ATP. We speculated that acto-G680V subfragment 1 complexes accumulate in the A.M.ADP.P(i) state on the basis of the biochemical phenotypes conferred by mutations which suppress the G680V mutation in vivo [Wu, Y., et al. (1999) Genetics 153, 107-116]. Here, we report further characterization of the interaction between actin and G680V subfragment 1. Light scattering data demonstrate that the majority of G680V subfragment 1 is bound to actin in the presence of ATP. These acto-G680V subfragment 1 complexes in the presence of ATP do not efficiently quench the fluorescence of pyrene-actin, unlike those in rigor complexes or in the presence of ADP alone. Kinetic analyses demonstrated that phosphate release, but not ATP hydrolysis or ADP release, is very slow and rate limiting in the acto-G680V subfragment 1 ATPase cycle. Single turnover kinetic analysis demonstrates that, during ATP hydrolysis by the acto-G680V subfragment 1 complex, quenching of pyrene fluorescence significantly lags the increase of light scattering. This is unlike the situation with wild-type subfragment 1, where the two signals have similar rate constants. These data support the hypothesis that the main intermediate during ATP hydrolysis by acto-G680V subfragment 1 is an acto-subfragment 1 complex carrying ADP and P(i), which scatters light but does not quench the pyrene fluorescence and so has a different conformation from the rigor complex.

PMID:
12135375
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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