Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Immunol. 2002 Aug 1;169(3):1277-82.

Chemotactic responsiveness toward ligands for CXCR3 and CXCR4 is regulated on plasma blasts during the time course of a memory immune response.

Author information

1
Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Plasma blasts formed during memory immune responses emigrate from the spleen to migrate into the bone marrow and into chronically inflamed tissues where they differentiate into long-lived plasma cells. In this study, we analyze the chemokine responsiveness of plasma blasts formed after secondary immunization with OVA. Starting from day 4 and within approximately 48 h, OVA-specific plasma blasts emigrate from spleen and appear in the bone marrow. Although these migratory cells have lost their responsiveness to many B cell attracting chemokines, e.g., CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)13 (B lymphocyte chemoattractant), they migrate toward CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha), and toward the inflammatory chemokines CXCL9 (monokine induced by IFN-gamma), CXCL10 (IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10), and CXCL11 (IFN-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant). However, the responsiveness of plasma blasts to these chemokines is restricted to a few days after their emigration from the spleen, indicating a role for these molecules and their cognate receptors, i.e., CXCR3 and CXCR4, in the regulation of plasma blast migration into the bone marrow and/or inflamed tissues.

PMID:
12133949
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.169.3.1277
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center