Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Aug;56(8):786-92.

Dietary fats and 16-year coronary heart disease mortality in a cohort of men and women in Great Britain.

Author information

1
University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts, UK. d.r.boniface@herts.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The paper aims to investigate the relationships of dietary fats to subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in men and women while taking account of other CHD-related behaviours.

DESIGN:

A cohort of randomly selected men and women were interviewed in 1984-85 and monitored subsequently for 16 y for deaths. The interview covered health, health-related behaviours, physical measurements, socio-demographic details and a dietary questionnaire. Appropriate exclusions left 1225 men and 1451 women aged 40-75 with 98 and 57 CHD deaths, respectively. Saturated, polyunsaturated and total fat intakes were estimated.

SETTING:

The sample was randomly selected from households in Great Britain. The interviews took place in participants' own homes.

RESULTS:

Not consuming alcohol, smoking, not exercising and being socially disadvantaged were related to high saturated fat intake and CHD death. Cox survival analyses adjusting for these factors found that a level of saturated fat 100 g per week higher corresponded to a relative risk for CHD death for men of 1.00 (0.86-1.18) and 1.40 (1.09-1.79) for women. This difference between the effects of saturated fat in men and women was statistically significant (P=0.019). Results are also reported for total fat and the relative effects of polyunsaturated and saturated fats.

CONCLUSIONS:

Strong evidence was found for the within cohort relationship of dietary fat and CHD death in women while no evidence was found for a relationship in men. Possible explanations for this are discussed.

PMID:
12122556
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601509
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center