Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acad Med. 2002 Jul;77(7):712-8.

The training and career paths of fellows in the National Research Service Award (NRSA) Program for Research in Primary Medical Care.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe the training and career paths of fellows in the National Research Service Award (NRSA) Program for Research in Primary Medical Care.

METHOD:

All fellows who graduated from 25 NRSA programs nationally between July 1988 and June 1997 (n = 215) were mailed a questionnaire. Personal characteristics, fellowship experiences, and current professional positions were compared between faculty researchers, faculty clinician-educators, and individuals who were not in full-time academic positions.

RESULTS:

A total of 146 NRSA graduates (68%) completed the survey. A mean of four years had elapsed since their fellowships. Of the respondents, 36% were faculty researchers, 32% were faculty clinician-educators, and 32% were not on full-time faculties. Faculty researchers did not differ from the other groups in demographics or acquisition of advanced degrees, but they were more often general internists than general pediatricians, family physicians, or from other disciplines (p =.002). Fellowship graduates spent a mean of 29% of their training in course work and 38% conducting research. Faculty researchers spent a greater proportion of their fellowship conducting research (46% versus 34% for clinician-educators and 31% for those not on full-time faculties, respectively, p <.0001). They were also more productive in terms of subsequent publications and grant acquisitions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Only a minority of those completing NRSA programs held positions as faculty researchers. The preponderance of general internists among researchers may indicate problems in the capacity of general pediatrics and family medicine to support primary care research. The amounts of direct research time during these fellowships may need to be increased to enhance the likelihood of subsequent research success.

PMID:
12114148
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center