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Mol Carcinog. 2002 Jun;34(2):59-63.

Matrilysin (matrix metalloproteinase-7) expression in ulcerative colitis-related tumorigenesis.

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1
Department of Pathology, St. Joseph's Hospital and University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Matrilysin (matrix metalloproteinase-7) plays a part in the initiation and growth of colorectal tumors; expression of this protein has been implicated in tumor invasion and metastasis. To date, matrilysin expression in ulcerative colitis (UC)-associated tumorigenesis has not been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the immunohistochemical expression of matrilysin at different stages of UC-associated neoplasia. Paraffin-embedded specimens from 25 patients with UC without dysplasia, UC-related low-grade dysplasia (LGD) and high-grade dysplasia (HGD), and UC-associated carcinoma as well as four colon biopsy samples with no abnormality were examined using an anti-human matrilysin monoclonal antibody and standard immunoperoxidase techniques. Matrilysin expression was recorded as the number of positive cases and the percentage of positive crypts as follows: normal: none of four; negative results for dysplasia: seven of 12 (< 10%); LGD: nine of 15 (< 10%); HGD: nine of 13 (11-50%); and invasive carcinoma: six of seven (> 50%). The results indicated an apparent switch from focal expression of matrilysin in UC-related low-grade dysplasia to widespread expression in high-grade dysplasia and invasive cancer, mimicking the pattern of expression in sporadic colorectal cancer. Although the sample size is small and further investigation therefore is required, the results suggest the possible role of anti-matrix metalloproteinase therapy in reducing the risk of progression from LGD to cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis. Published 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

PMID:
12112311
DOI:
10.1002/mc.10049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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